When you change the temperature on your thermostat, or the temperature in your home drops, a signal lets the furnace's igniter know that it's time to turn on. Igniters exist in both hot water boilers and forced air furnaces, replacing pilot lights as the switch your unit needs to kick on. Naturally, this is a core part in making sure it works reliably. When it stops working, your unit will not longer know when to actually heat your home. Fortunately, furnace igniter repair doesn't tend to be a major budget problem, and costs less than $300 on average.
An electric furnace provides warmth by moving air over and through a series of coils. Ductwork and vents then distribute that air to the individual rooms in your home. Repair costs will depend on both the brand and the exact nature of the problem, but tend to be lower than some of the options above. That's because the units are small, and issues tend to be contained within the heating elements themselves. Expect to spend less than $300 on your electric furnace repair, depending on the exact problem.
Even if your air conditioning unit is still working, depending on the type of system in your home today, you could recoup your investment in a new system in as little as three years. However, that doesn't mean that your system needs to be replaced. Furnaces, air conditioners, and other heating and cooling systems have made tremendous gains in efficiency over the past five years, so if you have an older unit, it is worth taking a look at whether or not a repair is the best investment.

If your furnace’s motor runs but the blower doesn’t move air, the belt that connects the two probably has broken. Replacing it is an easy fix. First, turn off all power to the unit and turn off the gas at the gas valve that serves the furnace. Remove the door on the front of the furnace cabinet to give you access to the blower (it might be on a slide-out drawer.) Check the number stamped on the belt and get an exact replacement from a home center or heating supply outlet.
To make sure the unit you select is the right size for your home, the Sears HVAC expert does an electronic load calculation estimate to determine the exact type of heat and air conditioning system that’s just right for your home–we don’t just replace it with the same size unit you currently have. These calculations take into consideration things such as the size of your home, its exposure to the sun and wind, the number and size of windows, how well insulated it is and more. This step is essential so the unit isn’t too small or too large–both waste energy.
The motor belt should be firm, giving no more than ½ inch when pressed. It should also be free of cracks and damage. To remove the belt, you will need a wrench and a replacement belt. Loosen, do not remove, the motor bolts. You only need them loose enough to move the motor and slacken the belt. Remove the belt and inspect it, replacing it with a new one if necessary. Belt: $4.00 to $6.00.
As Idaho’s HVAC comfort and zoning specialists, Ultimate Heating & Air handles all of your residential heating, cooling, and air quality requirements.  For every project, we target energy efficiency and reliability of your essential equipment, trimming cost of operation and ownership, while optimizing comfort.  Through industry-leading innovations in both products and strategies, we simplify the challenges of everyday life, put you in superior control over your indoor environment, and promote sustainable solutions.
High-efficiency condensing furnaces (90% AFUE and above) are a bit more complex than conventional furnaces. The main differences between a conventional and condensing furnace is the heat exchanger technology used to extract heat from the combustion process and the method used to exhaust the combustion gases. In these ways, the furnaces are very different. The condensing furnace does not have a significantly more efficient combustion process than does a conventional furnace; both use gas burners with electronic ignition. The difference lies in that the condensing furnace has a more efficient heat extraction process after combustion.
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